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THE STUDY OF THE POSSIBILITY OF AQUASOL PROCESS TO DEINK ONP AND MOW

Authors

A. Khalafi1, M.Faezipour2, M.Khatibzadeh3, M.M. Nazhad4 and A. Pirjani5

Companies

1-M.Eng. Student of Wood and Paper Sci. and Eng., Faculty of Natural Resources Faculty of Tehran University
2-Professor, Faculty of Natural Resources Faculty of Tehran University
3- Lecturer, Faculty of Polymer Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology 
4- Associate Professor, Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand
5- M.Eng. Of Wood and Paper Sci. and Eng, Production Manager of Latif Paper Co.

Keywords

Aquasol, deinking, print age, old newsprint, mixed office waste, surfactant, organic solvent, aging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT

In this study, aquasol process was used to deink ONP (Old Newsprint) and MOW (Mixed Office Waste). Aqua-solvent and Surfactants mixture was applied to dissolve disperse and remove ink. The efficient dislodge of ink requires optimized condition of retention time, temperature, solvent type and print age (i.e. aging). Finally, the contaminants, ink particles in particular, were removed along with the solvent by decantation.

The results indicated that the maximum brightness was achieved using 4 hours retention time, 60C temperature, with the print age of 6 months for both ONP and MOW.

Xylene is better than dichloromethane; dichloromethane cannot be used with conventional devices. The simultaneous increase of retention time and temperature, and decrease of print age will cause in increase in brightness. Besides, separate increase of retention time and temperature led increase in brightness. The lower the print age, the higher the final brightness achieved throughout process. In this case, the majority of brightness loss occurred during 6 months after printing and then the effect of aging on brightness is less significant.

The interactive and independent influences of variables discussed illustratively and thoroughly.

1. Introduction

Around 80% of total recovered paper can be obtained from 3 different sources: Cartons, Newsprints and Mixed Office Waste. Fewer than 20% of recovered papers were deinked in order to use in production of newsprint, tissues and other white papers (2). These data shows the significance of old newsprint and mixed office waste and it requires research and survey to process these kinds of raw material.

In 1991, 32MT of newsprint were produced worldwide which 8.5MT of it were recycled fiber (11). In this case, the proportion of recycled fiber in the production of newsprint was predicted to be threefold and reach 30MT in 2005(12).

Mixed office waste is a proper alternative of chemical wood-free pulp to manufacture high quality and high yield pulp (about 60-70%) (6). In Iran, the latif paper Co. is deinking mixed office waste by flotation to manufacture tissues.

The first use of the organic solvents in deinking was in 1930s which hydro-emulsion of chlorinated hydrocarbons has used (8). Chlorinated hydrocarbons dissolve resinous content of ink and remove them (3, 4, 5 and 9). However, solvents are not expected to dissolve all kind of contaminants and to be completed replacement for water in deinking process.

This also reported that the Riverside Paper Co. has used hot chlorinated solvents to remove wax and polyethylene from bleached board and it was successful in deinking (5).

Solvents can deink special printed paper, which can not be deinked by conventional deinking process, and gives dry pulp that can be shipped or stored. In addition, solvents would not result in water contamination and the level of fiber swelling in this process would be below 10 %( 1).

Solvents have the most efficient effect, which the paper is coated and the least efficient one, which the paper is not coated that higher amount of ink penetrated into paper.

2. Materials and method

1) Raw material (recovered paper)

In this study two type of paper were used as follows:

1.1- Old Newsprint (ONP)

These ONPs were collected from Ettelaat newspaper central office. The delivery dates of these samples were 200, 2001 and 2003 which print age of them were 0.5, 1 and 2 years respectively. This sample had stored in archive room which they were not subjected to the severe sunlight and undesirable heat and moisture.

1.2- Mixed Office Waste

These samples were collected from the yard and deinking line of Latif paper Co. in the collecting these samples special attempt was focused on selecting papers with exact print age of 0.5, 1 and 2 years. These papers were recovered from agricultural ministry, local agricultural offices, police offices, insurance institutes, natural resources offices and other individual companies.

2) Chemical

2.1- Xylene (C6H4 (CH3))

2.2- Dichloromethane-DCM (CH2Cl2)

2.3-Surfactants

Anionic:

  • Sodium Luril Benzene Sulfunate((C6H6)C11H23(H2ArSO3Na))
  • Sodium Di-Decyle Sulfate(N-Cetyle(CH3)3(NH3)Br)

Cationic:

  • N-Cetyle-N-N-N-Triamonium Bromide(N-Cetyle(CH3)3(NH3)Br)

3. Sample preparation

3.1-control sample

These samples collected from printed section of ONP and MOW (and processed without chemical) and were torn to 1.5cm1.5cm by hand. Solid mater content and MC of samples were determined.

3.2-main sample

These samples collected from printed section of newsprint and office waste and were torn to 1.5cm1.5cm by hand. Solid mater content and MC of samples were determined. The mix of main samples was: 100%ONP, 100%MOW and 50%ONP: 50%MOW.

4. Deinking procedure

After sample preparation, the deinking was conducted using Xylene, DCM and surfactants as follows:

4.1. Soaking (retention time)

In this stage, samples were soaked in the solution of anionic surfactant for 1, 2 and 4 hours and in 20, 40 and 60 C and neutral pH. Specified mass of samples were weighted and put into the prepared solution of anionic surfactant and the consistency was adjusted to 3.5%. Then the solution was put in hot water bath for specific time.

4.2-cationic surfactant addition

0.3 %( based on dry weight of fiber) of the cationic surfactant added to the solution while agitating gently to make it homogenous.

4.3-solvent interaction

After retention time, specified amount of Xylene or DCM was added to the system, and agitated intensively using glass bar in order to make solvent to have interface with paper surface and dissolve ink and other contaminants. In this stage it was observed that after agitation the solvent was darkened indicating the ink dissolved.

4.4-water-solvent decantation

After agitation, the suspension maintained stagnant then decantation was conducted. For being sure of efficient decantation, this stage repeated several times till total solvent washed away.

4.5-repulping

The suspension was repulped using kitchen blender (SUNNY blender). The consistency was adjusted to 5%. The repulping time was 7 minutes (This duration got by accomplishing several pre-tests).

4.6-handsheet making and brightness measurement

Handsheets were made using laboratory handsheet maker with the basis weight of 60gr/cm2 and the brightness (ISO %) of them was measured.

4.7- type of experimental design and statistical analysis method

The experimental design of this study was completely randomized incomplete mixed factorial design. The results were analyzed and the charts were drawn using SAS and SPSS software and GLM variance analysis method. The means was compared using Duncan's mean comparison test (in the level of 5%).

The variables and their level are shown in table 1.

Table1. Variables and their levels in this study

Variable

Unit

No. of levels

Levels

Print age

Year

3

0.5

1

2

temperature

C

3

20

40

60

Retention time

Hour

3

1

2

4

Paper type

-

3

MOW

MOW:ONP

ONP

 

The independent variables are anionic and cationic surfactant dose (0.3% and 0.4% respectively) and pH (about 7.5)

3. Results and discussion

Brightness is the most important optical properties of paper which has worldwide use in industries, universities and research institutes.

The brightness is often measuring in both side of paper (top and wire sides).

The control samples were repulped without chemical processing, handsheets were made and the brightness of top and wire sides was measured. These results presented in table 2.

Table 2. Brightness (ISO %) of top and wire sides of control samples

Samples

Brightness, ISO% top side

Brightness, ISO% wire side

ONP

46.00

43.55

MOW:ONP

65.00

62.35

MOW

89.00

88.00

The results of GLM variance analysis presented in table 3.

Table 3. Summary of GLM variance analysis for comparison independent and interactive effects of variables

Type of interaction

 

Factors

Brightness, ISO%

Top side

Wire side

Independent

t

**

**

T

NS

NS

a

**

**

P

**

**

Interactive

tT

NS

NS

ta

*

*

tP

NS

NS

Ta

NS

NS

TP

NS

NS

aP

**

**

tTaP

NS

NS

t:Retention Time   T:Temperature a: Print Age   P: Paper Type

**-significant in the level of 1%

*- significant in the level of 5%

NS- non-significant

1- Independent effects

I) retention Time

The brightness reached to the highest level in 4 hours (fig.1). This can be contributed to increase of water-surfactants solution penetration into paper which due to swelling of fibers and weakening the attachment between ink and fibers as well.

The reason for dramatic loss of brightness in 2 hours retention time is not clear.

Figure 1

Fig 1. Independent effect of retention time on brightness (ISO %) top and wire side

The same results reported in the literature that brightness got the highest level in 4 hours retention time and there is no difference between 1 and 2 hours. It also shown that in the retention time of range of higher that 4 hours the chromophore groups will appear.(10)

II) Temperature

One of the factors which facilitate the chemical reaction rate is temperature. In this study the effect of this factor was not significant statistically (table 2).

There is no difference between 20 and 40 C and brightness value decrease slightly in 40 C which its reason is not clear (fig 2).

Figure 2

Fig 2. Independent effects of temperature on brightness

Temperature influences wetting rate, defibration rate and dispersion of ink and other contaminants. It also decreases the viscosity of water and makes it to penetrate into fiber network rapidly and deeply. The higher the temperature, the lower the time of repulping (7). It has reported in the literatures that temperatures near 60 C during all stages of deinking would lead to increase of brightness higher than 25 and 95 C. the reason that brightness value decrease in 95 C is contributed to the raise of temperature above glass transition temperature(Tg) of ink(10).

III) Print age

Aging defines as the interval between printing and time of experiment (in case of ink) and interval between paper production and time of experiment (in case of paper). Brightness was expected to decrease dramatically with increase of print age in this study, but it was found that in the excessive print age of 6 months the brightness would decrease steadily and majority of aging occurs during 6 months print age. Therefore the brightness loss after 1 and 2 years were 4.09% and 3.8 5 respectively.

The other point should be mentioned here is that the higher the brightness gain in different print age shows the high efficiency of aquasol process.

Figure 3

Fig 3. Independent effects of print age on brightness

 The same result was reported in literature indicating that the majority of aging occurs during 5 months after printing and after that, there is not significant difference in brightness values (10).

IV)Paper type

As expected, the office waste and ONP pulps got the highest and lowest brightness value respectively (fig4). By comparison between these data and the data deriving from table 1, the brightness improvement is 6.25%, 4.75% and 2.68% for ONP, ONP: MOW and MOW respectively.

Major part of the MOW in Latif paper Co. were laser and copy printed papers and a little proportion of them were offset printed books, carbonless papers  and carbon printed papers. The samples collected from mentioned paper contain carbon printed papers. Solvent can not dissolve the laser and copy toner, so the 2.675 of improvement in MOZ can be contributed to the dissolved ink and other contaminants from the carbon printed papers in solvent.

As the ink used in offset newsprint was oil based, it can be concluded that solvents has the most efficient effect in processing of ONP.

Figure 4

Fig 4. Independent effect of paper type on brightness

Mow id made of chemical wood free bleached pulp with high brightness value while ONP is composed of high lignin content mechanical pulp, therefore, the difference between two brightness values justified.

Mix of ONP and MOW got the brightness value of 70% which is something between ONP and MOW.

2-Interactive effects

Interpretation of the results in this section was so complicated and in some sections authors just present the results. Three dimensional plane charts were used to show the trends accurately.

I) retention time and temperature

Retention time and temperature are important influential factors, the highest level of brightness has gained 4 hours retention time and 20 and 60 C and the lowest one has gained in 2 hours retention time and 40 C (reasons are not clear)(fig 5 and 6).In high temperatures and long retention time, surfactants has opportunity to enter into fiber network, swell fibers and wet the print which lead to detachment of fiber-ink bond and finally the solvent dissolve ink particles in order to remove them.

Figure 5

Fig 5. Interactive effects of retention time and temperature on brightness (top side)

Figure 6

Fig 6. Interactive effects of retention time and temperature on brightness (wire side)

II) Retention time and print age

Brightness id decreasing and increasing with increase of print age and decline in retention time respectively, with exception to 2 hours retention time and 2 years print age(the reasons are not known)(fig 7 and 8).

Figure 7

Fig 7. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (top side)

Figure 8

Fig 8. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (wire side)

III) Temperature and print age

Brightness got to the highest level in 20C with different print age and in 60 C with 2 years print age (reasons are not known)(fig 9 and 10).

Figure 9

Fig 9. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (Top side)

Figure 10

Fig 10. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side)

IV) Temperature, print age and paper type

Brightness in ONP and MOW increase and decrease with simultaneously increase of print age and temperature (fig 11, 12, 14, 15).

In mix of MOW: ONP increase of print age and temperature would lead to decline of brightness (fig 13 and 16 )

Figure 11

Fig 11. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (top side) in MOW

Figure 12

Fig 12. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (top side) in ONP

Figure 13

Fig 13. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (top side) in mix of MOW: ONP

Figure 14

Fig 14. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in ONP

Figure 15

Fig 15. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in OMW

Figure 16

Fig 16. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in mix of MOW: ONP

V) Print age, retention time and paper type

Simultaneously increase of retention time and print age would increase and decrease brightness respectively in both ONP and MOW (fig 17, 18, 19, 20) and decrease and increase of brightness in mix of ONP: MOW (fig21, 22).

Figure 17

Fig 17. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (top side) in ONP

Figure 18

Fig 18. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in ONP

Figure 19

Fig 19. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (top side) in MOW

Figure 20

Fig 20. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in MOW

Figure 21

Fig 21. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (top side) in the mix of MOW: ONP

Figure 22

Fig 22. Interactive effects of temperature and print age on brightness (wire side) in the mix of MOW: ONP

VI) Temperature, retention time and paper type

In MOW simultaneous increase of temperature and retention time, increase and decrease the brightness respectively(fig 25, 26).

In ONP, higher brightness was gained in short retention times and high temperatures and lower brightness was achieved in long retention time and low temperatures(fig.23, 24).

In the mix MOW: ONP simultaneously increase of temperature and retention time, decrease the brightness value(fig 27, 28).

Figure 23

Fig 23. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (top side) in ONP

Figure 24

Fig 24. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (wire side) in ONP

Figure 25

Fig 25. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (top side) in MOW

Figure 26

Fig 26. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (wire side) in MOW

Figure 27

Fig 27. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (top side) in the mix of MOW: ONP

Figure 28

Fig 28. Interactive effects of retention time and print age on brightness (wire side) in the mix of MOW: ONP

4. Conclusions

1. The best treatment variables

Using Duncan's mean comparison test, the best treatment variables are:

Retention time of 4 hours, temperatures of 60C, Print age of 0.5 year and paper type of ONP

2. Separate increase of retention time and temperature and decrease of print age results in improvement of optical properties.

3. Simultaneous increase of retention time and temperature and decrease of print age increase brightness.

4. Majority of aging occurs during 6 months print age and in excessive print age; the brightness loss will not be significant.

5. Aquasol can be used to deink carbon printed papers.

6. Increase of retention time in low temperatures (room temperatures) has not significant effect on brightness.

7. As the mix of MOW and ONP got the brightness value of 69.5%, thus mix of them can be used to manufacture medium quality papers.

8. Dichloromethane (DCM) can not be used in aquasol process with conventional tools and for using DCM it requires special designed machine.

9. Aquasol process is efficient in removal of stickies, which are present in mixed office waste.

5. References

1-Aldrich, L.C., 1995, Progress in Paper Recycling, pp. 63-67

2-Biermann, C.J., 1996, Handbook of Pulping & Papermaking, Academic Press, London, UK, P263

3-Bocci, A., 1966, U.S. Pat 3253976

4-Goss, R.B, 1971, U.S. Pat 3595741

5-Goss, R.B., 1974, Secondary Fiber-Operating Experience with the Riverside Recovery Process, Paper presented at TAPPI Secondary Fiber Conf. , Boston, MA

6-Gttsching, L., 1999, Recycled Fiber and Deinking, FAPET Oy, Helsinki, Finland

7-Hamilton, F.R., 1987, Pulping Systems in secondary fibers and non-wood pulping, the joint textbook committee of the paper industry

8-Hess, H.B., 1935, U.S. Pat 1990376

9-Johnson, A.E., 1967, Paper Trade J.153, no. 40:55

10-Kaul, K.K., 1999, Tappi J., Vol. 82, no.8, pp 115-120

11. Matussek, H., Salvesen, W., Pearson, J., 1993, International Fact and Price Book, Pulp & Paper International, Miller Freeman Inc., Sanfransisco

12-North American Waste Paper Study , 1991, Vol. 1, Market analysis and forecasting , Special study series No. 17, Resource information Systems Inc.

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